National Cycle Museum - Llandrindod Wells
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Museum Admission

Adults: £5.00
Senior Citizens: £4.00
Children 4-16: £2.00
Dogs £Free
Carers £Free
groups £discount for groups of 10+ visiting normal open days/times
groups £minimum group booking charge of £50 if visit is out of normal open days/times

We regret we cannot accept debit or credit cards.


Opening Times

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays
Open all year
10am-4pm

Days can usually be flexible for large groups depending on availability of staff

Museum Opening Times

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National Cycle Museum

The Automobile Palace
Temple Street
Llandrindod Wells
Powys - Mid Wales
LD1 5DL

Tel: 01597 825531
How to get to the National Cycle Museum Llandrindod Wells

Walkers Welcome National Cycle MuseumCyclists Welcome National Cycle Museum

Dogs are Welcome at the National Cycle Museum
Wifi Available at the National Cycle Museum


John Kemp Starley

. John Kemp Starley (1855[1]–1901)[2] was an English inventor and industrialist who is widely considered the inventor of the modern bicycle,[3][4][5] and also originator of the name Rover. Starley was born on the 24th of December 1855 and lived on Church Hill,[1] Walthamstow, London, England. He was the son of a gardener, John Starley and Mary Ann Starley (ne Cippen).[1] In 1872 he moved to Coventry to work with his uncle, the inventor James Starley. He worked with his uncle and William Hillman for several years building Ariel cycles.

In 1877 he started a new business Starley & Sutton Co with William Sutton – a local cycling enthusiast. They set about developing safer and easier to use bicycles than the prevailing penny farthing or "ordinary" bicycles. They started by manufacturing tricycles, by 1883 their products were being branded as Rover.

In 1885 Starley made history when he produced the Rover Safety Bicycle.[6][7] – a rear-wheel-drive, chain-driven cycle with two similar-sized wheels, making it more stable than the previous high wheeler designs. Cycling magazine said the Rover had 'set the pattern to the world' and the phrase was used in their advertising for many years. J. K. Starley & Co. Ltd advertisement In 1889 the company became J. K. Starley & Co. Ltd and in the late 1890s, it had become the Rover Cycle Company Ltd.

John Starley died suddenly in 1901 and was succeeded as managing director of the firm by Harry Smyth. Soon after his death the Rover company began building motorcycles and then cars.

The National Cycle Museum is suitable for all ages, we have wheel chair and push chair access and disability toilets on site.
National Cycle Museum - Llandrindod Wells
National Cycle Museum

The Automobile Palace, Temple Street, Llandrindod Wells, Powys, Mid Wales, LD1 5DL


Mid Wales Trading Website Designers for National Cycle Museum